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 Portugal has one of the worst stray animal problems in the whole of western Europe coupled with poor standards of animal welfare. There are many rehoming centres throughout Portugal to try and tackle the ever uphill battle of keeping stray animals off the streets but the ignorance of the problem is over looked by many, meaning there is no end for their work in sight.   This project follows Ginie.  Ginie joined the rehoming centre at the beginning of 2011. She has worked in behaviour, training, and rehoming canine companions for over 12 years internationally.  Before moving to Portugal, Ginie worked as President of a Dutch animal charity campaigning for animal rights and helping to rehome dogs from Southern Europe. Ginie’s home is on site and she lives with the animals 24/7.

Portugal has one of the worst stray animal problems in the whole of western Europe coupled with poor standards of animal welfare. There are many rehoming centres throughout Portugal to try and tackle the ever uphill battle of keeping stray animals off the streets but the ignorance of the problem is over looked by many, meaning there is no end for their work in sight. 

This project follows Ginie.

Ginie joined the rehoming centre at the beginning of 2011. She has worked in behaviour, training, and rehoming canine companions for over 12 years internationally.  Before moving to Portugal, Ginie worked as President of a Dutch animal charity campaigning for animal rights and helping to rehome dogs from Southern Europe. Ginie’s home is on site and she lives with the animals 24/7.

 Ginie works with a small pack of around 30 animals with over 20 coming in and being rehomed every month. Keeping the number of animals low means that they have a much better success rate at rehoming in comparison to other rehoming centres which are overrun because owners take on too many. Ginie wakes early to unlock the kennels and walk the dogs around the centre.   The centre was a dairy farm but with the recession of 2008 it was closed down and left abandoned and derelict until the it was turned into a rehoming centre for animals. 

Ginie works with a small pack of around 30 animals with over 20 coming in and being rehomed every month. Keeping the number of animals low means that they have a much better success rate at rehoming in comparison to other rehoming centres which are overrun because owners take on too many. Ginie wakes early to unlock the kennels and walk the dogs around the centre. 

The centre was a dairy farm but with the recession of 2008 it was closed down and left abandoned and derelict until the it was turned into a rehoming centre for animals. 

 There is a lot to do in the daily runnings of the facility even for just 30 animals. Ginie keeps track of vaccinations, pet passports and other daily maintenance of the centre. 

There is a lot to do in the daily runnings of the facility even for just 30 animals. Ginie keeps track of vaccinations, pet passports and other daily maintenance of the centre. 

 Ginie’s prior work fostering and rehoming dogs from abroad gives her a complete viewpoint about what they will need when moving to their new homes – be it in Portugal or another country.  Before her life with animals Ginie worked as a manager in many industries, including the horticultural world which remains a passion.

Ginie’s prior work fostering and rehoming dogs from abroad gives her a complete viewpoint about what they will need when moving to their new homes – be it in Portugal or another country.  Before her life with animals Ginie worked as a manager in many industries, including the horticultural world which remains a passion.

 Vet visits are very important to make sure that there is never any deceases spreading amongst her animals. The possibility of canine leishmaniasis in Portugal is very high as is heart worm.Canine leishmaniasis is a tropical disease transmitted to dogs by a tiny sandfly. Leishmaniasis cannot currently be cured, but it can be treated. Leishmaniasis causes a whole host of negative affects such as; skin lesions, alopecia, ulcerative dermatitis and often kidney failure.   It’s very important for puppies to be moved around to different volunteers to make sure they are comfortable in new environments.

Vet visits are very important to make sure that there is never any deceases spreading amongst her animals. The possibility of canine leishmaniasis in Portugal is very high as is heart worm.Canine leishmaniasis is a tropical disease transmitted to dogs by a tiny sandfly. Leishmaniasis cannot currently be cured, but it can be treated. Leishmaniasis causes a whole host of negative affects such as; skin lesions, alopecia, ulcerative dermatitis and often kidney failure. 

It’s very important for puppies to be moved around to different volunteers to make sure they are comfortable in new environments.

 These puppies are being handed over from some volunteers who have bottle fed the puppies since two days old, they found them in a sack at the end of their driveway. Ginie has to explain that these dogs should have been put down because now they’re going to have a much harder life because of being bottle fed. It’s a necessary evil in her eyes. The puppies will be moved to a different volunteer to see how they behave. 

These puppies are being handed over from some volunteers who have bottle fed the puppies since two days old, they found them in a sack at the end of their driveway. Ginie has to explain that these dogs should have been put down because now they’re going to have a much harder life because of being bottle fed. It’s a necessary evil in her eyes. The puppies will be moved to a different volunteer to see how they behave. 

 The rehoming centre is taking its toll on Ginie and she’s not sure how long she can carry on doing this for. It’s a constant never ending uphill battle rehoming animals in the Algarve and also educating people on what and what not to do. Portugal has a long way to go in the education of animal welfare she believes. 

The rehoming centre is taking its toll on Ginie and she’s not sure how long she can carry on doing this for. It’s a constant never ending uphill battle rehoming animals in the Algarve and also educating people on what and what not to do. Portugal has a long way to go in the education of animal welfare she believes. 

 The older healthy dogs have free reign of the dairy farm with it’s accompanying architecture. There is multiple derelict buildings that the dogs can explore. 

The older healthy dogs have free reign of the dairy farm with it’s accompanying architecture. There is multiple derelict buildings that the dogs can explore. 

 Ivan does all the manual labour at the centre. He’s been here for a couple years and hasn’t seen any change in the glut of animals coming in. He just wishes there was more education done on animal welfare to spread the awareness. 

Ivan does all the manual labour at the centre. He’s been here for a couple years and hasn’t seen any change in the glut of animals coming in. He just wishes there was more education done on animal welfare to spread the awareness. 

 Certain animals are quarantined off before being integrated into the rest of the animals. This is due to deceases they may have or certain negative traits they have against other animals. 

Certain animals are quarantined off before being integrated into the rest of the animals. This is due to deceases they may have or certain negative traits they have against other animals. 

 This Portuguese man came in and explained that he is looking after stray animals and that they’ve not been neutered and asks about the best course of action. He was given vouchers for the animals to be spayed or neutered at the local vets. One large way to cull the stray animal problem is through neutering and spreading the education of neutering. 

This Portuguese man came in and explained that he is looking after stray animals and that they’ve not been neutered and asks about the best course of action. He was given vouchers for the animals to be spayed or neutered at the local vets. One large way to cull the stray animal problem is through neutering and spreading the education of neutering. 

 Many dogs are taken away from dog hunting parties for boar hunting. The levels of neglect that these hunting parties have of their animals means the rehoming centre has to step in and take dogs illegally even if the dogs have severe wounds due to the tortuous training regimes of the hunters. 

Many dogs are taken away from dog hunting parties for boar hunting. The levels of neglect that these hunting parties have of their animals means the rehoming centre has to step in and take dogs illegally even if the dogs have severe wounds due to the tortuous training regimes of the hunters. 

 There is never enough hours in the day and enough people helping to tackle the problem in Portugal. Ginie explains that to tackle the problem there needs to be an RSPCA group that can push awareness and increase the state of animal welfare. 

There is never enough hours in the day and enough people helping to tackle the problem in Portugal. Ginie explains that to tackle the problem there needs to be an RSPCA group that can push awareness and increase the state of animal welfare. 

 During the day Ginie gets many calls about animals that have been given to the vets for her to have in the rehoming centre. Many dogs are either very sick or elderly. They try to do the most they can for each and every dog but most of the time it is more humane to have the dog put down to save the animal from any more suffering.

During the day Ginie gets many calls about animals that have been given to the vets for her to have in the rehoming centre. Many dogs are either very sick or elderly. They try to do the most they can for each and every dog but most of the time it is more humane to have the dog put down to save the animal from any more suffering.

 Ginie receives a call from the vets explaining they’ve had to put a dog down because they felt it was more kind to the animal. This is a daily occurrence and a necessary evil for combating the problem in the Algarve. 

Ginie receives a call from the vets explaining they’ve had to put a dog down because they felt it was more kind to the animal. This is a daily occurrence and a necessary evil for combating the problem in the Algarve. 

 The dogs may not have total freedom but they have the run of a 3 acre plot to make the best of their lives until they’re hopefully rehomed. 

The dogs may not have total freedom but they have the run of a 3 acre plot to make the best of their lives until they’re hopefully rehomed. 

Portugal has one of the worst stray animal problems in the whole of western Europe coupled with poor standards of animal welfare. There are many rehoming centres throughout Portugal to try and tackle the ever uphill battle of keeping stray animals off the streets but the ignorance of the problem is over looked by many, meaning there is no end for their work in sight. 

This project follows Ginie.

Ginie joined the rehoming centre at the beginning of 2011. She has worked in behaviour, training, and rehoming canine companions for over 12 years internationally.  Before moving to Portugal, Ginie worked as President of a Dutch animal charity campaigning for animal rights and helping to rehome dogs from Southern Europe. Ginie’s home is on site and she lives with the animals 24/7.

Ginie works with a small pack of around 30 animals with over 20 coming in and being rehomed every month. Keeping the number of animals low means that they have a much better success rate at rehoming in comparison to other rehoming centres which are overrun because owners take on too many. Ginie wakes early to unlock the kennels and walk the dogs around the centre. 

The centre was a dairy farm but with the recession of 2008 it was closed down and left abandoned and derelict until the it was turned into a rehoming centre for animals. 

There is a lot to do in the daily runnings of the facility even for just 30 animals. Ginie keeps track of vaccinations, pet passports and other daily maintenance of the centre. 

Ginie’s prior work fostering and rehoming dogs from abroad gives her a complete viewpoint about what they will need when moving to their new homes – be it in Portugal or another country.  Before her life with animals Ginie worked as a manager in many industries, including the horticultural world which remains a passion.

Vet visits are very important to make sure that there is never any deceases spreading amongst her animals. The possibility of canine leishmaniasis in Portugal is very high as is heart worm.Canine leishmaniasis is a tropical disease transmitted to dogs by a tiny sandfly. Leishmaniasis cannot currently be cured, but it can be treated. Leishmaniasis causes a whole host of negative affects such as; skin lesions, alopecia, ulcerative dermatitis and often kidney failure. 

It’s very important for puppies to be moved around to different volunteers to make sure they are comfortable in new environments.

These puppies are being handed over from some volunteers who have bottle fed the puppies since two days old, they found them in a sack at the end of their driveway. Ginie has to explain that these dogs should have been put down because now they’re going to have a much harder life because of being bottle fed. It’s a necessary evil in her eyes. The puppies will be moved to a different volunteer to see how they behave. 

The rehoming centre is taking its toll on Ginie and she’s not sure how long she can carry on doing this for. It’s a constant never ending uphill battle rehoming animals in the Algarve and also educating people on what and what not to do. Portugal has a long way to go in the education of animal welfare she believes. 

The older healthy dogs have free reign of the dairy farm with it’s accompanying architecture. There is multiple derelict buildings that the dogs can explore. 

Ivan does all the manual labour at the centre. He’s been here for a couple years and hasn’t seen any change in the glut of animals coming in. He just wishes there was more education done on animal welfare to spread the awareness. 

Certain animals are quarantined off before being integrated into the rest of the animals. This is due to deceases they may have or certain negative traits they have against other animals. 

This Portuguese man came in and explained that he is looking after stray animals and that they’ve not been neutered and asks about the best course of action. He was given vouchers for the animals to be spayed or neutered at the local vets. One large way to cull the stray animal problem is through neutering and spreading the education of neutering. 

Many dogs are taken away from dog hunting parties for boar hunting. The levels of neglect that these hunting parties have of their animals means the rehoming centre has to step in and take dogs illegally even if the dogs have severe wounds due to the tortuous training regimes of the hunters. 

There is never enough hours in the day and enough people helping to tackle the problem in Portugal. Ginie explains that to tackle the problem there needs to be an RSPCA group that can push awareness and increase the state of animal welfare. 

During the day Ginie gets many calls about animals that have been given to the vets for her to have in the rehoming centre. Many dogs are either very sick or elderly. They try to do the most they can for each and every dog but most of the time it is more humane to have the dog put down to save the animal from any more suffering.

Ginie receives a call from the vets explaining they’ve had to put a dog down because they felt it was more kind to the animal. This is a daily occurrence and a necessary evil for combating the problem in the Algarve. 

The dogs may not have total freedom but they have the run of a 3 acre plot to make the best of their lives until they’re hopefully rehomed. 

 Portugal has one of the worst stray animal problems in the whole of western Europe coupled with poor standards of animal welfare. There are many rehoming centres throughout Portugal to try and tackle the ever uphill battle of keeping stray animals off the streets but the ignorance of the problem is over looked by many, meaning there is no end for their work in sight.   This project follows Ginie.  Ginie joined the rehoming centre at the beginning of 2011. She has worked in behaviour, training, and rehoming canine companions for over 12 years internationally.  Before moving to Portugal, Ginie worked as President of a Dutch animal charity campaigning for animal rights and helping to rehome dogs from Southern Europe. Ginie’s home is on site and she lives with the animals 24/7.
 Ginie works with a small pack of around 30 animals with over 20 coming in and being rehomed every month. Keeping the number of animals low means that they have a much better success rate at rehoming in comparison to other rehoming centres which are overrun because owners take on too many. Ginie wakes early to unlock the kennels and walk the dogs around the centre.   The centre was a dairy farm but with the recession of 2008 it was closed down and left abandoned and derelict until the it was turned into a rehoming centre for animals. 
 There is a lot to do in the daily runnings of the facility even for just 30 animals. Ginie keeps track of vaccinations, pet passports and other daily maintenance of the centre. 
 Ginie’s prior work fostering and rehoming dogs from abroad gives her a complete viewpoint about what they will need when moving to their new homes – be it in Portugal or another country.  Before her life with animals Ginie worked as a manager in many industries, including the horticultural world which remains a passion.
 Vet visits are very important to make sure that there is never any deceases spreading amongst her animals. The possibility of canine leishmaniasis in Portugal is very high as is heart worm.Canine leishmaniasis is a tropical disease transmitted to dogs by a tiny sandfly. Leishmaniasis cannot currently be cured, but it can be treated. Leishmaniasis causes a whole host of negative affects such as; skin lesions, alopecia, ulcerative dermatitis and often kidney failure.   It’s very important for puppies to be moved around to different volunteers to make sure they are comfortable in new environments.
 These puppies are being handed over from some volunteers who have bottle fed the puppies since two days old, they found them in a sack at the end of their driveway. Ginie has to explain that these dogs should have been put down because now they’re going to have a much harder life because of being bottle fed. It’s a necessary evil in her eyes. The puppies will be moved to a different volunteer to see how they behave. 
 The rehoming centre is taking its toll on Ginie and she’s not sure how long she can carry on doing this for. It’s a constant never ending uphill battle rehoming animals in the Algarve and also educating people on what and what not to do. Portugal has a long way to go in the education of animal welfare she believes. 
 The older healthy dogs have free reign of the dairy farm with it’s accompanying architecture. There is multiple derelict buildings that the dogs can explore. 
 Ivan does all the manual labour at the centre. He’s been here for a couple years and hasn’t seen any change in the glut of animals coming in. He just wishes there was more education done on animal welfare to spread the awareness. 
 Certain animals are quarantined off before being integrated into the rest of the animals. This is due to deceases they may have or certain negative traits they have against other animals. 
 This Portuguese man came in and explained that he is looking after stray animals and that they’ve not been neutered and asks about the best course of action. He was given vouchers for the animals to be spayed or neutered at the local vets. One large way to cull the stray animal problem is through neutering and spreading the education of neutering. 
 Many dogs are taken away from dog hunting parties for boar hunting. The levels of neglect that these hunting parties have of their animals means the rehoming centre has to step in and take dogs illegally even if the dogs have severe wounds due to the tortuous training regimes of the hunters. 
 There is never enough hours in the day and enough people helping to tackle the problem in Portugal. Ginie explains that to tackle the problem there needs to be an RSPCA group that can push awareness and increase the state of animal welfare. 
 During the day Ginie gets many calls about animals that have been given to the vets for her to have in the rehoming centre. Many dogs are either very sick or elderly. They try to do the most they can for each and every dog but most of the time it is more humane to have the dog put down to save the animal from any more suffering.
 Ginie receives a call from the vets explaining they’ve had to put a dog down because they felt it was more kind to the animal. This is a daily occurrence and a necessary evil for combating the problem in the Algarve. 
 The dogs may not have total freedom but they have the run of a 3 acre plot to make the best of their lives until they’re hopefully rehomed.